Most vertical wreck

By | 2017-11-13T03:33:04+00:00 May 29, 2017|Diving & Aquatic Novelties, Records|

Most vertical wreck

Last updated: November 13, 2017 at 3:33 am

HMS Victoria, a Victoria class battleship of the Royal Navy, sank off Lebanon in 1893 after a collision with another warship. The wreck was discovered in 2004 at a depth of 150 m (492 ft) by Christian Francis of Lebanon Divers. The latter 1/3 of the wreck stands vertical as a result of its massive deck gun which buried the bow into the mud.

The Rusalka (Mermaid), a 62 m (204 ft) ironclad monitor of the Imperial Russian Navy, sank in the Gulf of Finland in 1893. It was discovered by sonar standing vertically in 2003.

SOURCE:
Hough, Richard. Admirals in Collision. London: Hamish Hamilton, 1959.

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Jeffrey Gallant is the Editor-in-Chief and Records Keeper of the Diving Almanac. He is also a contributing editor of DIVER Magazine, and the scientific director of the Greenland Shark and Elasmobranch Education and Research Group (GEERG). Jeffrey started diving in 1982.

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